AVOS – WHAT ARE THEY, AND HOW DO THEY WORK?

What does AVO stand for?

Apprehended

Violence

Order

What is an AVO?

An AVO is a court order that protects a person from another and ensures their safety. An AVO is NOT part of a criminal record – receiving an AVO simply means that you are prohibited from:

  • Violence/threats of violence
  • Stalking
  • Intimidation
  • Harassment of any kind
  • Property damage or threatening to damage property

AVO may also be known as ADVO (Apprehended Domestic Violence Order), a Restraint Order, Intervention Order or Family Violence Order. They have a validity of 2 years (unless otherwise agreed). AVOs are nationally enforced. Most AVOs are issued by Police when they are called out to a domestic dispute, for the person in need of protection.

You can apply for an AVO if you are:

  • Experiencing or have been threatened with physical violence
  • Being intimated, harassed or molested either in person or online and are fearing your safety
  • Being stalked by someone in your home, online, place or work or places that you go

How to defend an AVO that has been taken out against you:

  • Agree/consent to the AVO
  • Give the Court an undertaking
  • Make a cross application
  • Mediation
  • Challenge the order
  • Do nothing

AVOs issued by Police are provisional until there is an interim or final order made by court magistrate.

DVLOs (Domestic Violence Liaison Officers) are specialist police for Domestic and Family Violence  matters.

For more information, go to: https://www.lawaccess.nsw.gov.au/Pages/representing/lawassist_avo/lawassist_avo.aspx

Women’s Domestic Violence Court Advocacy program:

https://www.legalaid.nsw.gov.au/what-we-do/community-partnerships/womens-domestic-violence-court-advocacy-program/womens-domestic-violence-court-advocacy-service-locations-in-nsw

 

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